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4000 Series unpleasant "coloration"

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cmp
Joined: Jul 28 2009
Posts: 6

4000 Series unpleasant "coloration"

cmp
May 15, 2012 - 04:22 am

Hey all! In spite of the 4000 series status I have two of them and have worked great in studio.... However, trying to use in a live rig I'm having issues with a "color" that's added. An unwelcome one.... HaHa! It's a low level noise that almost sounds like a phasing? It's present all the time. I use the units in a switching system just like running into an fx loop on a guitar amp. My question is, Could this be a level issue? I'm getting a decent level on front panel. I just don't get it as these were seemingly whisper quiet when mixing a record using them..... now not so much. Any advice would be appreciated...... except the obvious.... "just upgrade"..... HaHa!!! Much Thanks!!!

nickrose's picture
Eventide Staff
nickrose
Joined: Jan 17 2008
Posts: 4598
nickrose
May 15, 2012 - 11:43 am

Most likely cause is incorrect levels, then ground loops. You can get a phasing effect if you mix the output with the input when using a non-delay effect type.

cmp
Joined: Jul 28 2009
Posts: 6
cmp
May 30, 2012 - 05:49 pm

Hey there, 

Thanks for your reply! Are you saying the "phasing" occurs regardless of levels when output is mixed with input? Most of the effects I use are delay in nature.... Delay w/flange..... or delay w/mod etc. So not too many non-delay effects. I really need to get to the bottom of this to determine if it's worth keeping these or moving up.... I thank you in advance, and I'm sorry I didn't respond sooner. I did not know you offered help so long ago. Thanks!!!!!

nickrose's picture
Eventide Staff
nickrose
Joined: Jan 17 2008
Posts: 4598
nickrose
May 30, 2012 - 06:05 pm

Pretty much any analog-digital-analog process (meaning any digital effect, not just ours) introduces a small delay, usually a few milliseconds. If do an analog mix of the output of such a process with the input, you will usually get a phasing effect (to be exact, a comb filter effect like that produced by an unswept flanger).

This does not usually occur with a delay-based (e.g. delay, reverb, pitch change) effect, since the above delay is usually tiny compared to the effect's delay. One normally avoids this problem by doing a digital wet/dry mix, where both the wet and dry signal are subject to the same delay. In most cases, you do not mix an undelayed effect, such as a compressor, with the dry signal.